When light conditions are low it can be more difficult to see other road users. This could be at dusk or dawn, or when it is dark, foggy or raining. In low light it is more important to ensure you can be seen and others can see you too.

There are different types of road users. It is important to be visible and to scan the road for others, whatever type of road user you are.

Some of the different types of road users include:

  • pedestrians or runners
  • cyclists
  • drivers
  • motorcyclists

There are different ways to make sure that you are visible on the road. For more information on how you can do this, find the section of this page which applies to you the most.

More guidance is available in the recent changes to the Highway Code.

Pedestrian

How to maximise your visibility:

  • wear reflective or fluorescent clothing or accessories such as belts, arm or ankle bands
  • carry a torch or clip lights
  • safely position yourself where approaching traffic can see you
  • use pavements and pedestrian crossings where they are available
  • avoid crossings between parked cars

Did you know?

Reflective materials reflect vehicle lights and streetlighting. This makes it much easier to be seen in the dark.

Fluorescent materials work best in the day or at times of poor daylight. If you don’t have either, wearing bright clothing is the next best thing.

How to maximise your vision:

  • when walking past driveways or in car parks watch out for vehicles pulling out
  • get regular eyesight checks to ensure your eyesight is at its best
  • avoid using your phone and headphones so you can hear vehicles approaching too
  • remember that electric vehicles are even quieter
  • always look multiple times before crossing the road to check it is safe. Check for cars around driveways and junctions.

Cyclist

How to maximise your visibility:

  • wear something reflective and fluorescent. This could be clothing or an accessory such as a belt, arm or ankle band.
  • ensure you have the correct lights
  • when stopped, and it’s safe to do so, check your lights and reflectors are clean and working
  • use cycle lanes where they are available
  • make sure you position yourself safely, where you can be seen by other road users if there isn’t a cycle lane. 
  • when passing parked vehicles, slow down and leave plenty of space

Free cycle training is available for anyone who would like support in riding more confidently.

Find out more about cycling routes in Merseyside

Did you know?

At night, the law requires cyclists to have white front and red rear lights lit. Cycles must also be fitted with a red rear reflector. Amber pedal reflectors, are required on bikes manufactured after 1 October 1985.

White front reflectors and spoke reflectors will also help you to be seen.  Flashing lights are permitted, but steady lights are better in areas without street lights.

Maximise your vision:

  • look all around to make sure it is safe before moving away from the kerb, pulling out to pass parked vehicles, turning at junctions or passing driveways
  • be considerate of pedestrians on shared paths by ringing your bell and slowing down
  • avoid the use of headphones so you can hear approaching vehicles
  • give way to pedestrians who are crossing, or waiting to cross, a road that you are turning into or exiting from
  • have regular eyesight checks to ensure your eyesight is at its best

Driver

Maximise your visibility:

  • always try to make sure you have something in the car that is reflective and fluorescent. It could be a piece of clothing or an accessory such as a belt, arm or ankle band. This will help to keep you safer when you leave the car.
  • use dipped headlights during the day to make you more visible to other road users
  • if your vehicle is fitted with daytime running lights, remember to turn on dipped headlights. Do this before it starts to get dark, or when daylight conditions are poor such as in rain or fog.
  • ensure your windows, lights and number plates are clean and clear
  • when passing parked vehicles, slow down and leave plenty of space

How to maximise your vision:

  • look all around to make sure it is safe before moving away from the kerb, pulling out to pass parked vehicles, crossing or turning at junctions and passing driveways
  • avoid distractions such as using your phone
  • ensure your windows and mirrors are clean and clear
  • ensure your wipers are working and your screen wash is topped up
  • give way to pedestrians who are crossing or waiting to cross a road that you are turning into or exiting from
  • have regular eyesight checks to ensure your eyesight is at its best

Did you know?

When passing cyclists and pedestrians, you should ensure you leave plenty of space between you and the other road user. For cyclists, this should be a minimum of 1.5m or about the size of a car.

Motorcyclist

How to maximise your visibility:

  • always try to make sure you wear something is that is reflective and fluorescent. This could be your clothing or an accessory such as a belt, arm or ankle band.
  • use dipped headlights during the day to make you more visible to other road users
  • whenever you are stopped, and it is safe to do so, wipe your lights, reflectors, and number plate
  • ride in the centre of your lane to make yourself as clearly visible as possible
  • when passing parked vehicles, slow down and leave plenty of space

How to maximise your vision:

  • look all around to make sure it is safe before moving away from the kerb, pulling out to pass parked vehicles, crossing or turning at junctions and passing driveways
  • avoid distractions such as using your phone
  • give way to pedestrians who are crossing or waiting to cross a road that you are turning into or exiting from
  • have regular eyesight checks to ensure your eyesight is at its best

Did you know?

Scratched or poorly fitting eye protectors can limit your view when riding. This can be worse in bright sunshine and the hours of darkness. To make sure you maximise your vision, keep your visor clean, clear and free from damage.